Preventing Tooth Decay - Dentist in Edmond OK

Healthy Eating for Preventing Tooth Decay

When in America, Do as the Romans: A Diet for Stopping Tooth Decay

In 2015, archaeologists announced they had analyzed dozens of sets of remains excavated from the ancient Roman city of Pompeii. After performing CAT scans on 30 individuals, the archaeologists made some interesting medical findings – among them, that the ancient Romans had no signs of tooth decay. Even before Mt. Vesuvius erupted in AD 79, Pompeiians appeared to have no use for dentists, indicating diet was the primary factor in preventing tooth decay.

What can Edmond dentists learn from the Ancient Pompeiians?

  • The ancient Romans ate almost no sugar.
    • The only sugars eaten by ancient Romans were those naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables. By contrast, American diet is full of added sugar, which teams up with plaque to eat away at tooth enamel. Particularly harmful are sticky sweets, like gummies and caramels, and sugary drinks like sodas; both tend to coat the tooth’s surface and promote increased decay. Substitute healthy snacks and bottled water instead.
  • Ancient Romans ate a great deal of fruits and vegetables.
    • Leafy green vegetables are a good source of calcium, which is a key to preventing tooth decay. Other good sources are milks, cheeses, yogurts and other dairy products. Just be mindful of added sugars, which can have the opposite effect on teeth.
  • Ancient Romans ate whole grains.
    • Whole grains are fiber rich, and along with fruits and vegetables, stimulate saliva production, which can decrease tooth decay. Also, whole grains are high in B vitamins and iron, which can help keep gums healthy.
  • Ancient Romans drank fluoridated water.
    • Archaeologists found that the water that supplied Pompeii was likely high in fluoride. Modern day fluoride treatments help make teeth more resistant to the attacks of plaque, bacteria, and sugars in the mouth. Make sure you follow your dentist’s prescribed fluoride routine.

In general, Americans have a lot to learn from a healthy Roman or Mediterranean diet, and it can have a surprisingly positive effect on your oral health. Ballinger Family Dentistry is a family dentist in Edmond OK that is committed to helping your family maintain excellent oral health.

Sources:

https://qz.com/516672/ancient-romans-had-no-need-for-dentists-because-of-one-food-they-didnt-eat/

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/11902097/Ancient-Romans-had-perfect-teeth-thanks-to-healthy-low-sugar-diet.html

https://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health-pictures/surprising-cavity-fighters.aspx

https://oralb.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/cavities-tooth-decay/foods-that-prevent-tooth-decay-cavities-naturally

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=4062

 

Best Toothpaste for Your Teeth - Edmond Dentist

Choosing the Best Toothpaste for Your Teeth

Finding the Right Toothpaste for You

There are a wide variety of toothpaste options available, and everyone should understand what options work best for their individual needs. Members of the same family may need to use different kinds of toothpaste based on their personal oral health, and the characteristics of their teeth. What kind of toothpaste should you be buying? Here are a few examples.

  • Swallowable toothpaste for young children. Young children are notorious for swallowing their toothpaste when learning to brush, or when parents are manually brushing their teeth for them. If you have a baby or toddler at home, opt for a swallowable option that doesn’t have strong chemicals or large amounts of fluoride. Always monitor your young child to reduce the likelihood of them swallowing toothpaste.
  • Whitening toothpaste for coffee drinkers. If you drink a lot of coffee, tea, or soda, a whitening toothpaste likely serves your needs best. Whitening toothpastes often have peroxide or baking soda, both of which lighten teeth. Additionally, whitening toothpastes are more abrasive, grinding away more food and stains. However, whitening toothpaste is the worst option for people suffering from any dental sensitivity.
  • Sensitive toothpaste. If you have sensitive teeth, you should use a sensitive formula, such as Sensodyne. This helps stave off sensitivity to hot and cold. Sensitive toothpastes are less abrasive.
  • Natural toothpaste. If you like to purchase natural products, there are many great types of toothpaste on the market. Be sure to opt for something with powerful cleaning ingredients, such as baking soda or xylitol.

If you are looking for an Edmond, dentist Ballinger Family Dental is the place for patients of all ages. We provide the best family dentists Edmond, OK has to offer. Learn more about our first-visit services, including examination, teeth cleaning, and advice on the right dental products to use at home.

Sources:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/10-tips-choosing-best-toothpaste/

https://www.deltadental.com/us/en/protect-my-smile/basics/choosing-the-right-toothbrush-and-toothpaste/selecting-the-right-toothpaste-for-your-dental-needs.html

https://www.bhg.com/health-family/staying-healthy/dental-health/choosing-a-toothpaste/

Dental Care Routine - Dentist In Edmond OK

Developing a Great Home Dental Care Routine

Keeping Your Teeth Healthy at Home With a Proper Dental Care Routine

Regular visits to the dentist should be a part of everyone’s dental care routine, but it’s also crucial to have a solid routine for dental care at home. Though it isn’t difficult, it is more than just brushing. A healthy dental routine consists of tasks performed daily or periodically in the home. Here are a few great steps to take for a better home dental routine.

Brush, Brush, Brush

Brushing first thing when you wake up and again before bed is integral to oral health. Additionally, it is best practice to brush after meals when possible. Everyone should brush for about two minutes, either in a circular motion with a manual toothbrush, or with an electric toothbrush. A special note for parents with children – let them brush on their own to instill good habits, but follow up by helping them to be sure their teeth are actually getting clean.

Floss

It’s best to floss every day, at least once a day, but not so often that gums become irritated. Many people don’t like flossing, however there are great alternatives If you don’t like to floss, consider a water-flossing device, which shoots powerful streams between the teeth. It’s a great idea to carry portable flossers on the go for flossing after meals. Flossing drastically reduces the risk of gingivitis and gum sensitivity, and is even linked to preventing oral cancer.

Mouthwash

Using an approved mouthwash with fluoride (for kids) and antibacterial properties freshens breath. Additionally, fluoride strengthens teeth and antibacterial ingredients like alcohol kill germs in the mouth.

What You Eat

It’s important to avoid certain foods for optimal oral health. Some of the worst offenders include coffee, soda, candy, highly acidic foods, and non-dentist approved chewing gum

If you are looking for an Edmond dentist, Ballinger Family Dental is a dentist in Edmond, OK. We are family friendly, and here to serve patients of all ages.

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20045536

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/best-practices-for-healthy-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/ten-dental-hygiene-tips-for-a-more-thorough-clean-1015

 

Why are my teeth sensitive?

Why do my teeth hurt with cold or hot foods, and drinks? They’re just really sensitive!

Why are my teeth sensitive?

Have you ever taken a big gulp of ice tea, or maybe it was hot coffee, and it set off crazy pain in some of your teeth? Sometimes, just simply bushing or flossing your teeth can be difficult due to sensitivity. Having sensitive teeth is not all that uncommon, and in this article we will look at some of the causes.

  • Tooth Decay – If you have fillings, over time they can weaken and cause leaking around the edges. This allows bacteria to accumulate, which leads to a build up of acid, and enamel breakdown. Under the enamel you will find microscopic canals that lead to the nerve of the tooth. Without the protective enamel layer, teeth are left vulnerable.
  • Brushing too hard – If you are using a hard bristled tooth brush like a handsaw, stop it! This will also lead to enamel breakdown.
  • Too Much Plaque – The purpose of flossing and brushing is to remove plaque build up. Again, this is another cause of enamel breakdown. It is important to visit a dentist regularly for cleanings.
  • Receding Gums – Receding gums will increase with age and lack of dental care. As a gum line recedes, it exposes some of the tooth that isn’t covered with enamel. Another pattern where enamel is involved!
  • Toothpaste & Mouthwash – Some toothpastes, especially those designed for tooth whitening, have various chemicals that people can be sensitive to.

You probably saw on this list the importance of tooth enamel, and how it protects the teeth. There are various causes for sensitive teeth, so be sure to consult with your dentist. If you have any concerns about your oral health, or are looking for a dentist in Edmond, contact Dr. Ballinger’s office to schedule an appointment!

Home Oral Care - Dentist In Edmond OK

Home Oral Care – Back To School

Now that school is back in session its time to get back to the basics of Home Oral Care!

Over the summer its easy to let things slide when it comes to taking care of our oral hygiene. We’re all guilty. Here are some tips from the ADA that can help us get back on track this school season. Attached below is a helpful PDF with some simple reminders. Be sure to print them off and place them somewhere visible for your student(s) to have as a reminder of what they should be doing everyday to keep their smile healthy and beautiful!

From the ADA – Introduction

Spending the right amount of time engaged in appropriate home oral care is undoubtedly essential to helping minimize the risk of caries and periodontal disease. An individual who visits the dentist twice a year for an oral exam and dental prophylaxis will spend approximately two hours per year in the dental chair. The time for that same person to brush and clean between his or her teeth each day might be estimated to be around 30 hours per year. Considering the amount of time that should be devoted to daily oral hygiene, it is important to understand the scientific evidence that supports home oral care recommendations made to patients.

In 2017, the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs identified three aspects of home oral care that dentists should discuss with their patients:
General recommendations that are applicable to most people;
Personalized recommendations specifically targeted to meet the needs of the individual patient, especially patients at increased risk of caries and/or gingivitis; and
Lifestyle considerations to enhance oral health and wellness.
The general and personalized recommendations were developed in accordance with a rapid evidence assessment methodology,1 meaning that the evidence examined was derived from existing systematic reviews (Data on File). Lifestyle considerations comport with current ADA policy. This Oral Health Topic page is an executive summary of that work and relevant ADA policy.

General Recommendations for the Prevention of Caries and Gingivitis

1) Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste
While a seemingly simple statement, the guidance for brushing twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste weaves together a number of discrete components.

Toothbrushing frequency
Review of the scientific literature, along with guidance from governmental organizations and professional associations found sufficient evidence to support the contention that twice-daily brushing, when compared with lower frequencies, was optimal for reducing risk of caries, gingival recession or periodontitis. It is important to recognize that in these studies, it was the frequency of tooth-brushing with a fluoride toothpaste that was evaluated rather than tooth-brushing alone.

Fluoride toothpaste
Although the measures used to assess the benefit varied, studies examining the effect of over-the-counter (OTC) fluoride dentifrice on caries incidence in children and adolescents found the fraction of caries prevented ranged from 16% per tooth to 31% per surface versus placebo or no dentifrice, and concluded that fluoride-containing toothpaste was effective in caries control. In addition, high level evidence shows that 5,000 ppm fluoride (available with a prescription) results in significantly more arrest of root caries lesions than use of OTC levels of fluoride (1,000 – 1,500ppm).

Toothbrushing duration
Data examining the question of optimal duration of daily tooth-brushing encounters relies on plaque indices which are surrogate measures rather than direct measure of caries or gingivitis. Understanding that the use of surrogate measures decreases the certainty with which a recommendation can be made, the available systematic reviews found a brushing duration of two minutes was associated with bigger reduction in plaque than brushing for a single minute. Two minutes per whole mouth can also be expressed as thirty seconds per quadrant or about four seconds per tooth.

2) Clean between your teeth daily
While cleaning between teeth is important to maintaining oral health, it is a concept that must overcome several barriers to adoption. ”Flossing” is often used as a shorthand, common term for interdental cleaning, which can become problematic in the real world where many report a strong distaste for that particular activity. Some people presume flossing as ineffective or unnecessary, which can also make it harder for them to adopt the daily habit. Flossing is a technique-sensitive intervention14 as exemplified by the disparity in benefit observed when comparing study designs involving self-flossing and professional flossing. Where patients do not see positive results from flossing, they may not continue to do so.

Using flossing as shorthand for interdental cleaning can also be problematic in that patients may be unaware of alternative devices that may be more pleasant or effective for them. A meta-review, which included the available devices developed for this purpose (i.e. dental floss, interdental brushes, oral irrigators, and woodsticks), addressed the question “What is the effect of mechanical inter-dental plaque removal in addition to tooth brushing on managing gingivitis in adults?” The strength of the evidence on the benefit ranged from weak to moderate depending on the device in question.

Thus, there may not be one “best” interdental cleaning method; rather, the best method for any given patient may be one in which they will regularly perform. A guiding principle which is relevant to interdental cleaning is: “best care for each patient rests neither in clinician judgment nor scientific evidence but rather in the art of combining the two through interaction with the patient to find the best option for each individual.”

3) Eat a healthy diet that limits sugary beverages and snacks
While eating a healthy diet is important for overall health and well-being, a review of the literature found little in terms of the effects of micronutrients on the risk of caries or periodontal disease. However, the conclusion of numerous systematic reviews on the effect of the macronutrient content of the diet, specifically of sugar, is that there is an association between sugar intake and caries. A review of the evidence supporting nine international guidelines recommending decreased consumption of sugar found consistent recommendations from all the groups while noting that they relied on different data and rationales.

4) See your dentist regularly for prevention and treatment of oral disease
Viewed through the prism of the primary prevention of caries and/or gingivitis, a systematic review of the literature failed to arrive at consensus regarding optimal recall frequency to minimize either caries or periodontal disease risk in part due to limited availability of studies addressing this topic. Nonetheless, in terms of the balance between resource allocation and risk reduction, it can be concluded that there is merit in tailoring a patient’s recall interval to individual need based on assessed risk of disease.

Previously, the ADA Healthy Smile Tips advised people to “Visit your dentist regularly.” However, dentists are doctors of oral health, which encompasses both the prevention and treatment of oral disease. The current recommendation goes a step further than its predecessor in articulating the duality of the dental visits. Dental care includes actions to reduce disease risk, as well as the formulation and execution of a treatment plan when disease is present.

Click Here to download your free Home Oral Care Guide!

To read the rest of this article from the ADA click here

Did you know these 5 facts about your teeth?!

Detect Oral Cancer Early - Dentist is Edmond OK

Detect Oral Cancer Early – What You Need To Know

The ADA has provided us with a very comprehensive study on how to detect oral cancer early.

Dental health is important for many reasons, but in this article we will be taking special focus on oral cancer. Through awareness we can help educate ourselves and others in order to prevent, detect and treat oral cancer. Here are some key points to take into consideration from the ADA website:

Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

  • Although they border each other, the oral cavity (OC) and oropharynx (OP) are separate, nonoverlapping anatomic regions.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignancy in the OC and OP, accounting for 90% of cancers of the head and neck.
  • OC and OP cancers account for 2.9% of all cancers diagnosed in the U.S. and 1.6% of all cancer deaths.
  • The 5-year relative survival rate for those with localized disease at diagnosis is 83%, compared with only 36% in patients whose cancer has metastasized.
  • The major risk factors for OC-SCC and OP-SCC are tobacco use, alcohol consumption, interaction between heavy use of tobacco and alcohol together, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and chewing betel quid (“paan,” often practiced in Asian, migrant Asian, and other communities).
  • The National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) provides an oral cancer examination protocol for dental practitioners.

Risk Factors

The major risk factors for OC-SCC and OP-SCC are tobacco use, alcohol consumption, interaction between heavy use of tobacco and alcohol together,10, 11 and chewing betel quid (“paan,” often practiced in Asian, migrant Asian, and other communities). Ultraviolet exposure may be the likely risk factor associated with SCC of the lip. Older age and male sex also increase the risk of OC/OP-SCC.5Smoking-associated risk appears to be dose dependent and correlates with daily or cumulative cigarette consumption. For patients who quit smoking, the risk for OC-SCC and OP-SCC declines over time and may approach that of nonsmokers after 10 or more years of cessation. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection1 is a major risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer, rather than oral cancer (see following section “Focus on HPV”).

The increase of oral tongue SCC seen among young white women does not appear to be associated with either tobacco or alcohol use or HPV infection and has been suggested to have a different causative mechanism (e.g., genetic abnormalities such as Fanconi anemia, other oncogenic viral infections, or other environmental exposures). There is an increased risk for OC/OP-SCC in patients with certain rare heritable conditions, including Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, and Bloom syndrome.

Signs and Symptoms

Two oral lesions that could be precursors to cancer are leukoplakia (white patches) and erythroplakia (red patches). Although there is a known potential for malignant transformation, the majority of leukoplakias will not progress to cancer. Some oral lesions will show a combination of red and white features, termed erythroleukoplakia, speckled leukoplakia, or speckled erythroplakia. Although less common than leukoplakia, erythroplakia and lesions with erythroplakic components have a much greater potential for becoming cancerous.

Because these white and/or red mucosal patches have an increased risk of becoming or already harboring invasive carcinoma, they have collectively been classified as “potentially malignant disorders.”1 Any white or red patch/lesion that does not resolve in 2 weeks should be reevaluated and considered for biopsy to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

OP-SCC develops most frequently in the tonsillar region and base of the tongue, often appearing as an ulcerated mass, fullness, or irregular erythematous mucosal change. OP-SCC tumors are thought to present at a more advanced stage than OC-SCC because of their ability to grow undetected and their propensity for metastasis. The most common chief complaints are the presence of a neck mass (from metastatic disease), sore throat, and dysphagia.

Other possible signs and symptoms of oral cancer that patients may report include:

  • a lump or thickening in the oral soft tissues
  • soreness or a feeling that something is caught in the throat
  • difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • ear pain
  • difficulty moving the jaw or tongue
  • hoarseness
  • numbness of the tongue or other areas of the mouth
  • swelling of the jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable

Signs and symptoms that persist for 2 weeks or more merit further investigation, such as a biopsy or referral to a specialist.

To read the full article on the ADA website click here

Disclaimer from the ADA

Content on the Oral Health Topics section of ADA.org is for informational purposes only. Content is neither intended to nor does it establish a standard of care or the official policy or position of the ADA; and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ADA is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Should you go electric? Click Here to find out!

Electric Toothbrush?

Is it really a better option to brush with an electric toothbrush? In this article, we will discuss the benefits of using this method of brushing over it’s  manual counterpart.

Electric Toothbrush?

Long before the the invention of the toothbrush, people were using a variety of different methods to achieve oral health. Everything from chewing sticks to using feathers has been discovered. The first bristle toothbrush related to our modern invention, was discovered in China, and made from hog bristles. The toothbrush began to be mass produced in the United States in 1885, however brushing did not become routine until after WWII.

Here are some of the properties of both manual and electric toothbrushes:

  • Traditional – Manual toothbrushes can still get the job done. The goal of brushing is to remove plaque and debris from your teeth, without destroying tooth enamel or irritating the gum tissue. There are correct and incorrect ways to brush your teeth, especially with a manual toothbrush. As with any toothbrush, over time, the bristles can wear out, causing brushings to be less effective. When using a traditional toothbrush, people will sometimes brush too hard. Brushing too hard with a manual brush is not only hard on your teeth but also on your gums, leading to gum issues
  • Electric Toothbrush – An electric toothbrush uses motion and pressure from the brush itself so the bristles can reach further. In fact, most of these brushes are set on a certain time, which makes for longer brushing, better brushing and a cleaner mouth. When using a manual toothbrush, there is a tendency to brush too hard, causes enamel break down. With an electric toothbrush, it will do the work for you! They are also a great way to fight gum disease and bad breath. A good electric toothbrush can lead to a great improvement in a person’s overall oral health. Remember, if you hav any questions about dental care or need to schedule an appointment, don’t hesitate to contact Ballinger Family Dentistry!
Dentist in Edmond

Dentist in Edmond: Zoom Teeth Whitening

Dentist in Edmond: Should you get your teeth whitened with zoom?

Your Dentist in Edmond provides Zoom Whitening for patients looking to whiten their smiles. Zoom Whitening is an in-office whitening procedure, unlike the whitening kits you can take home Zoom requires a pre-procedure evaluation and teeth cleaning at your dentist’s office. During the procedure, your Dentist in Edmond will ensure to cover all a patient’s lips and gums before applying a hydrogen peroxide whitening gel. The nex step in the Zoom process involves using a special light to break up stains and discoloration on the tooths surfaces. The is no anesthesia required for the procedure so patients are free to watch TV or listen to music.

What is Tooth Whitening?

Whitening a patient teeth is a cosmetic dentistry procedure that removes stains and discoloration, the end result being the patient has a whiter and more confident smile. It’s one of the single most popular dental procedures and range in complexity from dental visits and consultations to-do-it-yourself kits that you can take home. The reason that tooth whitening is so popular is due to the easy nature of the procedure as well as the immediately visible results. Tooth whitening is extremely cost-effective compared to other procedures one might use to get perfectly white teeth.

Why would you need Tooth Whitening?

Maybe you’re ready for a change or you’re doing some self-improvement,  either way, yellow or stained teeth are a common problem that most adults will develop during their lives. Tooth enamel is designed to protect the interior of the tooth from the effects of chewing, biting, plaque bacteria, and sugar. Even with proper care, a person’s teeth can start to show signs of wear. Coffee drinkers and smokers will see stains on their teeth develop over time. Most of these surface issues can be improved with teeth whitening procedure, which is why your Dentist in Edmond offers Zoom Whitening.

 

Dentist in Edmond

Dentist in Edmond: Basic Hygiene Part III

Welcome to your Dentist in Edmond’s last Basic Oral Hygiene article!

Here we are at that last article in the series, your Dentist in Edmond hopes that you’ve enjoyed our trip down memory lane with our review of some basic oral hygiene. Let’s jump in.

Dentist in Edmond: You are what you eat.

We won’t be going into nutrition as much as we will be discussing how foods interact with plaque and the bacteria that eat away at your tooth enamel. Your Dentist in Edmond is sure that at this point it’s news to no one sugary foods help bad bacteria in your mouth grow. The sugar helps those bacteria multiply making it harder to get rid of them and harder on your teeth, even sugar from fruit can help them grow. If you’re looking for foods that won’t harm your teeth you can look for cheeses and dairy, which will rinse off easily, and non-acidic vegetables and meat.

Damage to teeth

Your Dentist in Edmond sees a fair amount of damaged teeth, most are the results of accidents, but a chip no matter how small can cause larger problems. Out teeth are protected by tooth enamel, beneath that is the dentin, a softer bone material that protects the roots. Once the enamel has been breached the dentin is fair game and will erode much faster. Getting chipped teeth repaired right away is the only way to avoid your teeth from falling prey to the aggressive bacteria in your mouth.

It’s still important to come see us

Even if you have excellent tooth health and you have excellent oral hygiene practices it’s still important to come in for a checkup. You Dentist in Edmond can perform oral cancer screening, x-rays that let a patient know their teeth are growing in properly and if there will be any complication.

Dentist in Edmond

Dentist in Edmond: Basic Hygiene Part II

Dentist in Edmond’s Basic Oral Hygiene Part II

Your Dentist in Edmond is back at it this week talking about basic oral hygiene, and how fighting the basic plaque that forms on teeth can save your teeth and your wallet lots of pain. Let’s get into this week by continuing to talk about the plaque.

Dentist in Edmon: The effects of plaque

Over time plaque will pick up mineral from the saliva in your mouth and form tartar. This hardened tartar is so hard that removing it at home with a brush and flossing is impossible and a patient will have to go to the dentist to get it removed. Tartar build begins in between the teeth but it can quickly spread out from there in extreme cases. If the tartar is left it can cause gingivitis or periodontal (gum) disease causing the gums to pull away from the teeth.

Brushing and Flossing the right ways:

If you brushing and flossing your already on your way to good oral and dental health, however, you could be doing it wrong. When you floss you want to pull the floss at an angle so that it moves against your tooth. Simply pushing the floss up and down through the gap won’t do enough to clean out the plaque and can damage your gums, causing them to bleed from the trauma. Your Dentist in Edmond also sees people who brush too hard, or who have purchased a toothbrush with stiff bristles that hurt their gums. When you finish brushing your teeth you don’t want your gums to feel like they’ve been scoured. Brushing too hard can actually damage the gums where they protect the root of the tooth.

Thank you for staying with us

Thank you for reading our series on basic oral hygiene, next week your Dentist in Edmond will be wrapping up the series, talking about foods, eating habits, and chipped teeth. Find us here next week!